• The New England Coven of Traditionalist Witches (N.E.C.T.W.) was formally named in 1972 after Gwynne Thompson’s coven as the tradition began to spread beyond her immediate teaching circle. Gwen Thompson, a hereditary witch from New Haven, Connecticut, started teaching outside of her family in the late 1960s. She shared a blend of her family’s practices and popular occultism, which has been handed down in its present form to her spiritual descendants.
  • While N.E.C.T.W. and Nemed Cuculatii share many things in common with Wicca, we are a Witchcraft tradition, not a Wiccan tradition. If you are seeking a Wicca coven or tradition, we are not the group for you.
  • Nemed Cuculatii:
    • Our focus encompasses magic, sorcery, spirituality, legends, and lore.
    • Nemed Cuculatii does not charge for training, with members responsible for materials and contributing to group activities. Financial stability before enrollment is encouraged. Our training program emphasizes both individual and group participation, featuring extensive reading, assigned projects, and active involvement.
    • Nemed Cuculatii is not a democracy, nor does it operate on consensus. While group input may be solicited in the decision-making process, ultimately all decisions are made by the Lady of Nemed Cuculatii and they are final.
    • Nemed Cuculatii has a “zero-tolerance policy” on the subjects of drug and alcohol abuse.
  • Here are some key elements of the Traditionalist Approach:
    • Ancestral Heritage:
      • Lineage: A strong emphasis is placed on the historical and familial roots of the tradition. Practices and beliefs are often traced back through specific lineages, in this case through Gwynne Thompson’s family lineage from Somerset and the West Country.
      • Oral Traditions: There is a body of lore and knowledge that is only passed down orally, preserving the integrity and authenticity of the teachings.
    • Structured Training and Initiation:
      • Degrees of Initiation: The tradition includes a structured system of initiation, with multiple degrees that represent different levels of knowledge and responsibility within the coven.
    • Rituals and Ceremonies:
      • Traditional Rituals: These may include specific ways of creating Sacred Spaces, invoking deities, and using ceremonial tools.
      • Seasonal Celebrations: The tradition celebrates the “Wheel of the Year”, marking seasonal changes with Sabbats (major festivals) and Esbats (full moon rituals). These celebrations are acknowledged as a recent borrowing in from modern Wiccan/Pagan practices and were not part of the body of lore passed to Lady Gwynne by her grandmother.
      • Magical Practices:
        • Folk Magic: Traditionalist witchcraft often incorporates elements of folk magic, using herbs, charms, and other natural objects in spellwork. Our Coven involves communion with spirits of Place and Land, the Good Neighbors, the Old Ones, and the Mighty Dead.
        • Ceremonial Magic: Some aspects of ceremonial magic, such as the use of specific ritual gestures, words of power, and complex ritual structures, are also incorporated.
      • Ethics and Philosophy:
        • Personal Responsibility: Practitioners are encouraged to take personal responsibility for their actions and the consequences of their magical workings.
        • Respect for Nature: A deep respect for the natural world and its cycles is central to the tradition. This includes ethical considerations around the use of natural resources and living in harmony with the environment.
        • Interconnectedness: The belief in the interconnectedness of all life is a fundamental principle. This includes understanding how actions affect not just the individual but the broader community and ecosystem.
      • Overall, the Traditionalist Approach to witchcraft in Nemed Cuculatii is characterized by a deep respect for historical continuity, structured learning, ethical conduct, and a profound connection to nature and ancestral wisdom. This approach seeks to preserve the richness and depth of traditional practices while adapting them to contemporary contexts.
  • If you are interested in learning more, please read Working ith Us.